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The Origins Of AI Art

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The Origins Of AI Art

Max Bense, a German philosopher, developed his Information Aesthetics theory between the late 1950s to the early 1960s. This groundbreaking concept focused on the development of scientific measures that would bring objectivity to aesthetics. He was able to link art and rationality by applying mathematics to his theory. This opened the door to a new understanding about digital art.

Bense's theory provided a new framework in which art could be objective and not externally influenced. Frieder Nake and Georg Nees were scientist-artists. Bense's Information Aesthetics influenced Michael Noll as they explored how algorithms could be used to create visual art.

Nees was the first to exhibit publicly his "computer art" at a 1965 seminar organized by Bense: The Institute of Philosophy and Theory of Knowledge.

Digital art began to rise beyond aesthetic theories at this point.

Harold Cohen was a British artist who lived in California in the 1970s. He developed the AARON program - a computer program that creates visual images automatically.

Cohen began his research by looking for ways to apply AI to fine arts. He continued to work on AARON after it was created. The program could be used to make better decisions, such as selecting colours or composition. Originally, AARON could only produce monochrome line drawings. It evolved to create digital prints of coloured shapes such as human figures and foliage.

Bense's argument that art should be developed according to rational ideas stated that rationality is our primary defense against fascism. In the early days of computer art, computer artists were focused on creating generative aesthetics. This theory is based upon removing subjectivity from artistic process and creating an aesthetic perspective that is supported by science.

In the interview below Nake also defends the idea of generative aesthetics. He comments on how computer arts are not intended to create masterpieces, but rather to produce a series of designs. These designs do not focus on artistic craft but rather rational aesthetic coherence.

Harold Cohen was a British artist who lived in California in the 1970s. He developed the AARON program - a computer program that creates visual images automatically.

Cohen began his research by looking for ways to apply AI to fine arts. He continued to work on AARON after it was created. The program could be used to make better decisions, such as selecting colours or composition. Originally, AARON could only produce monochrome line drawings. It evolved to create digital prints of coloured shapes such as human figures and foliage - the first instances of AI art.

 


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